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To vaccinate or not - rowanfae

About To vaccinate or not

Previous Entry To vaccinate or not Nov. 4th, 2003 @ 11:35 am Next Entry
Many people don't realize that vaccines are optional. We're always told that our children cannot attend school or other activities without proof of them. This is simply not true. Every state offers exemptions. There are 3 categories of exemptions; Philosophical, Religious, and Medical.

The following 19 states allow exemption to vaccination based on philosophical beliefs: Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Idaho, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington and Wisconsin. In many of these states, a person must object to all vaccines and not just some in order to use this exemption. It's important to know the laws of your state.

All states allow a religious exemption to vaccination except Mississippi and West Virginia. All states handle this type of exemption differently. Some have broad statutes that include personal beliefs and others go as far as to require you to belong to a church with written tenets that would prohibit vaccination. Again, it's important to know the laws of your individual state when writing your exemption letter.

All states offer medical exemptions. Proof of medical exemption must take the form of a signed statement by a Medical Doctor (M.D.) or Doctor of Osteopathy (D.O.) that the administering of one or more vaccines would be detrimental to the health of an individual. Some states accept a physician's letter without questions. Others allow the state health dept. to review the case and make their own decision.

Whether or not to vaccinate is one of the many important decisions that we make as parents. I believe that all parents should educate themselves before they vaccinate (or make any other parenting decisions). Informed choice should be just that - informed. Too many people go along with vaccinating blindly, never knowing it carries a risk. Why? It's just what you do.

From the National Vaccine Information Institute:

Vaccination is a medical procedure which carries a risk of injury or death. As a parent, it is your responsibility to become educated about the benefits and risks of vaccines in order to make the most informed, responsible vaccination decisions.

Read the package insert for vaccines. Make sure that you know the risks involved. If you feel the risks outweigh the benefits, don't vaccinate. If you feel the benefits outweigh the risks, do. If you aren't sure: wait. Vaccinations can always be given later, they cannot be taken back. Some people take a delayed approach to vaccines, to allow the child's immune system to develop before assaulting it with toxins (yes, carcinogenic toxins: Formaldehyde and Thimersol). Did you know that vaccines are the only thing that the same dosage is used for a 7lb infant as a 200lb adult male? If you did that with Tylenol, it would be called overdose.

Vaccines are not as effective as you may think:
  • A child who receives the MMR vaccine can still get measles. (This occurred in 1987 in Texas where 96% of the cases were considered non-preventable, i.e. they were fully vaccinated, had a religious or medical exemption or they were born before 1957. This also occurred in 1989 in Texas where 72% of the cases were considered non-preventable.) These facts are from the Texas Department of Health.

  • Oct/Nov 1990, clinical mumps developed in 54 students. 53 out of 54 were fully vaccinated! Reported in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, July 1995; 149 (7):774-778.

  • Children who have been vaccinated against pertussis can still contract the disease. (Chicago Department of Health noted that of 186 pertussis cases in Chicago fall of 1993, "74% were as up to date as possible on their immunizations.") JAMA, July 7, 1994).



If you are pro-life, you may be interested to know that some vaccines are cultured in aborted fetal tissue.

I firmly believe that vaccines are a choice and no one else should make the decision for you. Parents should review the information available to them and make an informed decision that suits their family best. Research is important. I had intended to write more here, but I'm typing all of this one handed while holding a sleeping infant. However, here are a few links with information, please feel free to add more in the comments.
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Many people don't realize that vaccines are optional. We're always told that our children cannot attend school or other activities without proof of them. This is simply not true. <b>Every</b> state offers exemptions. There are 3 categories of exemptions; Philosophical, Religious, and Medical. <lj-cut text="Read More">

The following 19 states allow exemption to vaccination based on <b>philosophical beliefs: </b>Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Idaho, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Washington and Wisconsin. In many of these states, a person must object to all vaccines and not just some in order to use this exemption. It's important to know the laws of your state.

All states allow a <b>religious</b> exemption to vaccination except Mississippi and West Virginia. All states handle this type of exemption differently. Some have broad statutes that include personal beliefs and others go as far as to require you to belong to a church with written tenets that would prohibit vaccination. Again, it's important to know the laws of your individual state when writing your exemption letter.

<b>All</b> states offer <b>medical exemptions.</b> Proof of medical exemption must take the form of a signed statement by a Medical Doctor (M.D.) or Doctor of Osteopathy (D.O.) that the administering of one or more vaccines would be detrimental to the health of an individual. Some states accept a physician's letter without questions. Others allow the state health dept. to review the case and make their own decision.

Whether or not to vaccinate is one of the many important decisions that we make as parents. I believe that all parents should educate themselves before they vaccinate (or make any other parenting decisions). Informed choice should be just that - informed. Too many people go along with vaccinating blindly, never knowing it carries a risk. Why? It's just what you do.

From the <a href="http://909shot.com/Issues/Intro_Message.htm">National Vaccine Information Institute</a>:
<blockquote>
Vaccination is a medical procedure which carries a risk of injury or death. As a parent, it is your responsibility to become educated about the benefits and risks of vaccines in order to make the most informed, responsible vaccination decisions.</blockquote>
Read the package insert for vaccines. Make sure that you know the risks involved. If you feel the risks outweigh the benefits, don't vaccinate. If you feel the benefits outweigh the risks, do. If you aren't sure: wait. Vaccinations can always be given later, they cannot be taken back. Some people take a delayed approach to vaccines, to allow the child's immune system to develop before assaulting it with toxins (yes, carcinogenic toxins: Formaldehyde and Thimersol). Did you know that vaccines are the only thing that the same dosage is used for a 7lb infant as a 200lb adult male? If you did that with Tylenol, it would be called overdose.

<a href="http://www.healthsentinel.com/Vaccines/">Vaccines are not as effective as you may think:</a>
<blockquote><ul><li>A child who receives the MMR vaccine can still get measles. (This occurred in 1987 in Texas where 96% of the cases were considered non-preventable, i.e. they were fully vaccinated, had a religious or medical exemption or they were born before 1957. This also occurred in 1989 in Texas where 72% of the cases were considered non-preventable.) These facts are from the Texas Department of Health.</li>
<li>Oct/Nov 1990, clinical mumps developed in 54 students. 53 out of 54 were fully vaccinated! Reported in Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, July 1995; 149 (7):774-778.</li>
<li>Children who have been vaccinated against pertussis can still contract the disease. (Chicago Department of Health noted that of 186 pertussis cases in Chicago fall of 1993, "74% were as up to date as possible on their immunizations.") JAMA, July 7, 1994).</li>
</ul>
</blockquote>
If you are pro-life, you may be interested to know that <a href="http://www.geocities.com/titus2birthing/VacProLife.html">some vaccines are cultured in aborted fetal tissue</a>.

I firmly believe that vaccines are a choice and no one else should make the decision for you. Parents should review the information available to them and make an <i>informed</i> decision that suits their family best. Research is important. I had intended to write more here, but I'm typing all of this one handed while holding a sleeping infant. However, here are a few links with information, please feel free to add more in the comments.
<blockquote><a href="http://home.san.rr.com/via/PROVAX/provaxme.htm>"A list of Medical and Pro-Vax Support Groups</a>
<a href="http://home.san.rr.com/via/PROVAX/provaxarticles.htm">Some pro-vax articles</a>
<a href="http://www.909shot.com">National Vaccine Information Center</a>
<a href="http://www.whale.to/vaccines.html">WHALE site - tons of info, mostly against vaccines</a>
<a href="http://home.san.rr.com/via/PROCHOICE/prochoic.htm">A list of Pro-Information Groups, Information & Resources</a>
</blockquote>
If you don't read any of the above links, please check out the <a href="http://www.whale.to/vaccines/pack.html">package inserts</a>.
Leave a comment
From:logane
Date:November 4th, 2003 09:47 am (UTC)
(Link)
How timely that you would post this now. I'm facing losing our pediatrician if I don't have Walt's vaccines updated by the 13th of the month. We're on medicaid, and this is the only doc in the city who would take him with his other medical needs. If the doc won't take him anymore (and he says he won't), then our only other option is the community health clinic. It's weighing very heavily on me right now.
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From:pasketti
Date:November 4th, 2003 01:54 pm (UTC)
(Link)
That statement's missing a comma. It should read:
"Vaccination is a medical procedure, which carries a risk of injury or death."

ALL medical procedures carry a risk of injury or death, even something as simple as putting on a bandaid. Vaccinations are nothing special here.

When I was a kid, whooping cough, diptheria, measles, and rubella were all fairly common. Kids got them all the time. And some of those kids died. Now you never see them. Kids that would have died are staying alive.

Smallpox has been gone for 25 years or so. Polio is on track to be eliminated within a few years (ask someone who can remember the 1950s about polio). Both because of vaccinations.

You just have to ask yourself what are the odds of anything happening if you don't vaccinate versus the the odds of anything happening if you do. And try to keep the risks in perspective. For example, the single most dangerous thing that people do to their children they do all the time without even thinking: they take them for a ride in their car.

The anti-vaccination movement is a fairly recent development. It arose around the time that the epidemics of the recent past faded from memory. But the thing to remember is that the epidemics were eliminated by those very same vaccinations.
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